Intellectual Freedom News

Intellectual Freedom News 1/14/2022

LibLearnX: The Library Learning Experience is a completely new conference experience built from the ground up based on years of research, exploration, and feedback from industry partners, event planning experts, and most importantly, ALA members. Educational sessions at LibLearnX will feature experience-based learning, including engaging discussions, hands-on workshops, idea exchanges, “bite-size” learning, and other specific formats to match your learning styles and objectives. Participation in LibLearnX will strengthen your connections and knowledge, while also supporting the association that advocates for your industry and advances our shared mission.

Intellectual Freedom News

Intellectual Freedom News 1/7/2022

“When I read the recent headline in The Atlanta Journal-Constitution entitled “Movement would ban LGBTQ books, online materials from school libraries,” I felt like I was in an episode of “The Twilight Zone.” I felt like I had been blasted to the past. But, no, it is not the 1950s or 1960s. It is 2022, and our “leaders” are trying to ban books.” Guest Column by Cicely Lewis in The Atlanta Journal-Constitution.

Intellectual Freedom News

Intellectual Freedom News 12/31/2021

“This is to say Lange’s claims that libraries exist to protect children from books he personally finds “sexually objectionable” is incorrect. Libraries exist to provide all people with the information they need or want in accordance with library collection development policies. It is as much a person’s right to access and view library resources as it is another’s right not to. No one has the authority to choose what another citizen of this country may read.” Janice Grover-Roosa in the Wyoming Tribune Eagle

Intellectual Freedom News

Intellectual Freedom News 12/27/2021

“The Vermont Library Association (VLA) stands firmly against any legislation that restricts or impedes any education on Racism, ‘Divisive’ Concepts, Racial Injustice, Black American History and Diversity Education in libraries and educational institutions,” reads the letter, sent out earlier this week. “This includes any books, resources, curriculum or programming that libraries provide. Furthermore, we believe that it is imperative to call attention to portions of our history that have been previously omitted, misrepresented, distorted or misstated.”

Intellectual Freedom News

Intellectual Freedom News 12/10/2021

“Libraries offer students the opportunity to encounter books and other material that they might otherwise never see and the freedom to make their own choices about what to read. Denying young people this freedom to explore–often on the basis of a single controversial passage cited out of context–will limit not only what they can learn but who they can become.” NCAC Statement on the attack on books in schools

Intellectual Freedom News

Intellectual Freedom News 12/03/2021

In recent months, a few organizations have advanced the proposition that the voices of the marginalized have no place on library shelves. To this end they have launched campaigns demanding the censorship of books and resources that mirror the lives of those who are gay, queer, or transgender, or that tell the stories of persons who are Black, Indigenous or persons of color. Falsely claiming that these works are subversive, immoral, or worse, these groups induce elected and non-elected officials to abandon constitutional principles, ignore the rule of law, and disregard individual rights to promote government censorship of library collections. Some of these groups even resort to intimidation and threats to achieve their ends, targeting the safety and livelihoods of library workers, educators, and board members who have dedicated themselves to public service, to informing our communities, and educating our youth. ALA strongly condemns these acts of censorship and intimidation.

Intellectual Freedom News

Intellectual Freedom News 11/12/2021

“The South Carolina Association of School Librarians (SCASL) upholds the First Amendment rights and Freedom to Read of all our citizens, including students in South Carolina schools. We strongly condemn any form of censorship or removal of books and materials from libraries without following established processes.” SCASL’s Statement on censorship, the Freedom to Read, and in support of School Librarians