Banned Books Uncensored: LGBTQIA+ Stories and Gender Identity

Banned Books Uncensored: Free Webinar on Defending Titles with LGBTQIA+ Content

The most cited reason for challenging library materials and services is because of LGBTQIA+ content. In the free webinar, GLAAD President and CEO Sarah Kate Ellis and banned illustrator Stevie Lewis (Prince & Knight) will be joined by censorship experts (OIF Director Deborah Caldwell-Stone, associate professor Shannon Oltmann) and librarians who have defended LGBTQIA+ titles (Stephanie Beverage, Tom Taylor) for a can’t-miss conversation that explores this censorship issue.

Word Bubbles and brick wall, hate speech

Oregon’s Stand-Against-Hate Initiative: DOJ compelled to document extralegal speech under amended intimidation statute.

Oregon’s new stand-against-hate initiative is, in part, a reaction to the fatal MAX stabbings in Portland three years ago. But asking the government to intervene in our extralegal interactions does more to divide us than it does to unite. Especially when these interventions call for the compiling of data on speech that is of no legal consequence whatsoever.

Tweets by Robert Barnes @Barnes_Law comparing the Covington John Does and Alex Jones lawsuits.

“The Impact of Covington Will Be the Whole World”: Doxing, Privacy, and Free Speech in the Age of Pervasive Tech

Lawyer Robert Barnes seeks to prevent the next social media lynch mob by setting legal and cultural precedents for doxing, recording in public, implicit defamation and the ‘of and concerning’ standard, congressional speech immunity under statute, legal jurisdiction in online crimes, and the contours of speech and press freedoms. Barnes represents anonymous clients connected to Covington Catholic High School on matters regarding the 2019 Lincoln Memorial incident, as well as independent media figure Alex Jones of InfoWars.

The Summer of Owen Todd by Tony Abbot

Requests for Reconsideration at the Public Library Part Four: Sensitive Topics and Abuse

Child sex abuse is a serious problem but how do we talk to kids about it? How do we give children the tools and language to understand how to reach out if they are victims or if they know someone who is? There is no easy answer. One way that author Tony Abbot chose was the route of storytelling. Sharing stories can provide both a mirror and a window.