The words "Censored" in red block letters

Librarians Beware: Self-Censorship

Dubbed self-censoring, there is a growing concern that many librarians are purposefully omitting certain books and content from library collections due to personal bias opposed to professional judgment.  According to an article in the School Library Journal, self-censorship is “a dirty secret that no one in the profession wants to talk about or admit practicing. Yet everyone knows some librarians bypass good books—those with literary merit or that fill a need in their collections.”

authors Ellen Hopkins, Gayle Pitman, and e.E. Charlton-Trujillo speak about being disinvited from schools

Author, Please Come! Nevermind. Please Don’t.

Setting aside the fact that it’s just rude, rescinding an author’s invitation to speak because the content of their book is controversial is, in fact, censorship. The physical book may not be off the shelf, but the author’s message is still being stifled. One person is making a choice for the entire school community, that what this author has to say is not of value.

April Daniels, a woman with long hair and glasses, smiles at the camera.

An Interview with Author April Daniels

After we read Dreadnought by April Daniels, my friends and I had a lot of questions. I decided to ask the author herself, and Ms. Daniels graciously agreed to an interview. This will be the first in four-part series of interviews with trans authors who have published books about trans characters, exploring their writing and depictions of trans characters.