authors Ellen Hopkins, Gayle Pitman, and e.E. Charlton-Trujillo speak about being disinvited from schools

Author, Please Come! Nevermind. Please Don’t.

Setting aside the fact that it’s just rude, rescinding an author’s invitation to speak because the content of their book is controversial is, in fact, censorship. The physical book may not be off the shelf, but the author’s message is still being stifled. One person is making a choice for the entire school community, that what this author has to say is not of value.

April Daniels, a woman with long hair and glasses, smiles at the camera.

An Interview with Author April Daniels

After we read Dreadnought by April Daniels, my friends and I had a lot of questions. I decided to ask the author herself, and Ms. Daniels graciously agreed to an interview. This will be the first in four-part series of interviews with trans authors who have published books about trans characters, exploring their writing and depictions of trans characters.

Could Genre-based Classification Limit Intellectual Freedom?

BISAC headings have made their way into public and school libraries as well. A 2013 Knowledge Quest issue on the “Dewey Debate” provides a good intro to the “Dewey or don’t we” debate in school libraries, and many public libraries have made news for their move toward the “bookstore model,” what is often called a more patron-friendly approach than the Dewey Decimal System.