Galápagos Tortoise

A Censored Science Book for Banned Books Week

Charles Darwin’s On the Origin of Species is the most commonly banned science book and is important in laying the foundation for evolutionary biology. Darwin’s widely accepted theory of natural selection is the key to understanding genetics, pathogens, and epidemiology – critically important topics as misconceptions about science influence politics and public health policy.

School Library Journal

The School Library Journal’s Survey on Weeding: An Analysis

The School Library Journal’s survey on children’s/YA collection development and weeding, published this past June, paints the picture one would expect: circulation of print materials was down 73%, circulation of ebooks was up 91%, and both public and school libraries decided to purchase more digital materials. However, the report did contain at least one surprising piece of information: a “quarter of respondents…say their weeding criteria have changed over the last few years.” One reason for these changes? A growing “awareness of unconscious racial bias, inclusion and diversity.”

Kate Klise

Green-Dots Mean Go, Part Two: An Interview with Kate Klise, Author of Don’t Check Out This Book!

By: guest contributor Brian E. Wilson, ALSC Liaison for the ALA Committee on Professional Ethics. Acclaimed children’s author Kate Klise talks about how Cathy Evans’ “green dot collection” inspired her and her sister M. Sarah Klise to create the hilarious and inventive new novel, Don’t Check Out This Book!.

Lisa Hoover, Public Services Librarian at Clarkson University, and Michelle Young, Dean of Libraries at Clarkson University, at the NYS Capitol building on Legislative Advocacy Day. Photo by Ginger Tebo, School Library System Director at St. Lawrence-Lewis BOCES.

Advocating for our patrons

Overall, going to legislative advocacy day was a really positive experience. I think it is important for librarians to speak up about the importance of libraries and the needs of our patrons. Many of our patrons – especially in school libraries – can’t speak up for themselves about what they need. In today’s fiscal climate, I think we need to speak up to make sure we can continue to serve our patrons’ needs.