Freedom to Read Week

“My Head is Sort of Private”: The Twilight Saga as Privacy Parable

Celebrate Freedom to Read Week February 21st to the 27th by learning more about book challenges, catching up on freedom of expression news, or curling up with your favorite banned book! This post recognizes banned author Stephenie Meyer. While critics fault Twilight for negative depictions and poor writing, I prefer to think I enjoy the series for its nuanced exploration of privacy. Escape to the mossy forests of Forks and a time before high-speed internet, smartphones, and social media to explore the privacy themes in Twilight!

Banned Books Week 2020: Censorship is a Dead End, Find Your Freedom to Read logo.

#BannedBooksWeek By the Numbers: Making Virtual-First Count

Among the many challenges of 2020, there is another challenge we’ve faced down in the past and will continue to face in the future: book challenges. Censorship doesn’t take a sick day – and book ban and challenge statistics reported by the Office of Intellectual Freedom prove it. But for the first time, our annual commemoration of the fight against book censorship and other content challenges went virtual-first. Inspired by the Harper’s Index, this post measures Banned Books Week 2020 by the numbers – and shows how intellectual freedom advocates made virtual-first count.

Social media apps on a smart phone

US Eyes TikTok Ban While Books are Pulled From Hong Kong Libraries

A ban seems a bit like using a meat cleaver where a scalpel might be more appropriate. I’m also troubled by the potential message a TikTok ban sends; we want to encourage China to be more protective of and open to free speech, especially in light of the troubling shift toward censorship in Hong Kong. Can we really do that if we are banning their apps? By banning their apps, are we taking steps in that same direction?

Tweets by Robert Barnes @Barnes_Law comparing the Covington John Does and Alex Jones lawsuits.

“The Impact of Covington Will Be the Whole World”: Doxing, Privacy, and Free Speech in the Age of Pervasive Tech

Lawyer Robert Barnes seeks to prevent the next social media lynch mob by setting legal and cultural precedents for doxing, recording in public, implicit defamation and the ‘of and concerning’ standard, congressional speech immunity under statute, legal jurisdiction in online crimes, and the contours of speech and press freedoms. Barnes represents anonymous clients connected to Covington Catholic High School on matters regarding the 2019 Lincoln Memorial incident, as well as independent media figure Alex Jones of InfoWars.

Kate Klise

Green-Dots Mean Go, Part Two: An Interview with Kate Klise, Author of Don’t Check Out This Book!

By: guest contributor Brian E. Wilson, ALSC Liaison for the ALA Committee on Professional Ethics. Acclaimed children’s author Kate Klise talks about how Cathy Evans’ “green dot collection” inspired her and her sister M. Sarah Klise to create the hilarious and inventive new novel, Don’t Check Out This Book!.