The Summer of Owen Todd by Tony Abbot

Requests for Reconsideration at the Public Library Part Four: Sensitive Topics and Abuse

Child sex abuse is a serious problem but how do we talk to kids about it? How do we give children the tools and language to understand how to reach out if they are victims or if they know someone who is? There is no easy answer. One way that author Tony Abbot chose was the route of storytelling. Sharing stories can provide both a mirror and a window.

The Life and Opinions of Amy Finawitz by Laura Toffler-Corrie

Requests for Reconsideration at the Public Library Part Two: Growing Bodies

It’s the right of any parent to determine the best time to talk about sensitive issues with their children but we need titles that talk about bodies from as young as pre-k picture books. It is up to the parent to determine what titles are appropriate for their children and this specific title is age-appropriate in the children’s section.

Dinosaurs for Kids by Ken Ham

Addressing Requests for Reconsideration at the Public Library Part One: Biblical Dinosaurs

When I took my first job as a collection librarian, I assumed that most of the challenged books at public libraries fell into the familiar categories we see in the “frequently banned and challenged” lists that are featured during Banned Books Week: Harry Potter; Go Ask Alice; Are You There God? It’s Me, Margaret. I was wrong.

Hands on a fence.

Charging for the right to read: who really pays?

Ultimately, when it comes to a fundamental right like reading, all prisoners should have equal access regardless of ability to pay. As I have argued before, reading can play an important role in educating and rehabilitating those prisoners who want to reform. When we place barriers to information between prisoners and rehabilitation, I would argue that they aren’t the only ones who pay – we all do.