Photo of Brandi Levy in high school, wearing a Mahoney High School cheerleading uniform and holding gold pom poms. in front of the supreme court

Mahoney v. Levy: the Evolution of Students’ First Amendment Rights

On Wednesday, June 23, 2021, the Supreme Court ruled 8-1 in favor of Brandi Levy and public school students’ speech rights, in the case Mahoney School Board v. Brandi Levy. In 2017, Levy, then a 14 year old high school student in Pennsylvania, tried out for her school’s varsity cheering squad. After not making the team, she vented her frustrations in a Snapchat video, where she flipped off the camera and dropped a few swearwords. The school, after seeing the video, subsequently suspended her from the junior varsity cheer squad, saying that her video and its message violated the cheerleading code of conduct. After failing to come to a resolution with the school, Levy and her parents sued, arguing that punishing her for off campus speech violated Levy’s First Amendment rights.

Florida State Capitol

Intellectual Freedom on College Campuses: An Update on Current State Legislation

The term intellectual freedom has been recently tossed around by state lawmakers to justify new laws targeting college campuses. The recent laws and policy changes mainly target one of three things: faculty tenure, curriculum, or freedom of speech. This post will provide an update on new laws or incidents happening in various states.

Student Press Freedom Day 2021 is Journalism Against the Odds

Student Journalists are Essential: Support Student Press Freedom Day

The theme for Student Press Freedom Day 2021 is Journalism Against the Odds. According to the Student Press Law Center, “in the face of phenomenal news coverage, student journalists have produced despite being faced with incredible challenges of a year consumed by not only a global pandemic but widespread racial justice protests.” Student Press Freedom Day 2021 is on Feb. 26; there are several ways to support the day