March Book Two by John Lewis

Inspired by Protests: Reading March in 2020

The protests of 2020 and the tragic and painful hindsight of 20/20 make March a compelling, tragic, and inspiring read as we follow the renewed/continued/ever-more-urgent calls for racial justice in this country and around the world. Telling the story of John Lewis’s unparalleled life as a civil rights activist, March narrates Lewis’s and the U.S. history with the fierce urgency of today.

Pride flag with the word closed

The Library is Closed: Reflections on Self-Censorship, Pride, Silence, and Solidarity

By guest contributor E. F. Schraeder. These are risks and possibilities when a librarian opts to honor PRIDE month or recognize LGBTQ authors and readers throughout the year in other ways. Each June almost like clockwork, it seems some library or other is on the receiving end of public noise: shame or praise, for hosting or cancelling an event with LGBTQ community members in mind.

Children of Blood & Bone by Tomi Adeyemi

Exploring Social Justice through Sci-Fi & Fantasy

I personally really enjoy (if “enjoy” can be considered the right word) the exploration of tough social justice issues through the lens of fantasy or science-fiction – often through the vehicle of anti-magic prejudice. I feel the fantasy context allows the reader to take a step back from the real world, while allowing the reader to think critically about equality and justice in a less personally challenging way.

American Library Association Rainbow Book Month

Pride Displays During Rainbow Book Month

June is Rainbow Book Month, presented by the ALA Rainbow Round Table. Their work is especially important in its 50th year, with censorship of Rainbow library books, programs, and displays on the rise. Since the OIF began tracking Display Challenges in December 2016, 40 of the 54 reported challenges are for LGBT content (74%). Many libraries have policies for book challenges but displays are not always specifically written in.