Unite Against Book Bans: Book Résumés

Across the country, school librarians have been on the intellectual freedom frontlines defending access to books, building understanding about policies and library procedures, and dispelling misinformation. In collaboration with the publishing community, Unite Against Book Bans unveiled a free resource for the community. AASL President-Elect Becky Calzada shares her thoughts on how this tool can be used.

Banned Books Week 2023: Programs, Day of Action, and More 

Libraries, schools, bookstores, and groups around the world will be calling attention to censorship – and ways to fight it – October 1 – 7, 2023. The American Library Association […]

The Art of the Book Review

The Art of the Book Review: School Library Journal staff and reviewers discuss the review process

One of the main talking points you’ll see again and again when it comes to fighting book challenges is that you should be able to back up any purchase you make with your collection development policy. Many collection development policies cite professional review sources as one of the major ways library staff find quality materials to add to their collection. For library staff that work with youth, School Library Journal (SLJ) is a go-to professional review source. That’s why SLJ put together the webinar: From Book Submission to SLJ Star: Insight on the School Library Journal review process to explain what goes into their reviews. For this webinar Shelly Diaz, Reviews Editor for School Library Journal, is joined by Mahnaz Dar, Senior Editor, Professional Reading & Reference for SLJ, Ashley Leffel a middle school librarian and reviewer for SLJ, and Kiera Parrott, former Reviews Director for SLJ and LJ.

The words “Banned Book Reading Group” on a gray background. A image of Texas with the Prosper Independent School District logo on top of it is to the left of the text.

“Banned Book” Reading Group Among Parents in Prosper Texas in the Face of Book Challenges in Their School District

In January of this year the Prosper Citizen Group Political Action Committee (Prosper PAC), a conservative political action group operating in Prosper, Texas, asked the Prosper Independent School District (PISD) to remove a list of 82 books from their libraries on the grounds that they were sexually graphic, violent and inappropriate for children. A group of Prosper ISD parents have created a reading group so they can decide for themselves whether these titles should be removed from Prosper schools. One of those parents is Holly Lister Draper who in February posted a review of one of the books from the Prosper PAC’s list, The Pants Project by Cat Clarke, on her Facebook page.

The Legacy of The Bluest Eye: A Top 10 Banned Book of 2021

Despite efforts to keep a new generation of students from a transformative encounter with Morrison’s work, The Bluest Eye remains relevant and reflective of American society over 50 years after its original publication in 1970. This cultural relevance is the reason why it maintains its place on recommended reading lists for Advanced Placement assessments across the country. It is why the novel still brings me to tears, and still has important things to teach us about reckoning with racialized concepts like beauty and gender, and how ugliness renders one invisible.