Photo of exhibit called Our Family Tree at Utah Museum of Natural History

Freedom to Use Your Mind

To fully understand intellectual freedom, it seems crucial to consider what kinds of barriers to these activities might exist in our local communities and broader American society. The ones I initially think of include self-imposed determinations — I can’t question that! — to outside restrictions — library users in this district can’t access this book! — but perhaps there are others.

databases

Responding to Database Challenges

Most librarians are aware of books that get challenged and the tools needed to protect their library against censorship, but censorship can also affect our digital content, whether it’s databases, e-books, streaming content, apps or electronic tools. Be aware of the current trend in challenges to these materials and how ALA is working with librarians and vendors to protect access to these great resources.

National School Library Standards icons

Intellectual Freedom is Central to the National School Library Standards

Intellectual freedom advocates have many reasons to be excited about the National School Library Standards for Learners, School Librarians, and School Libraries that will be released at the AASL National Conference November 9-11. School librarians champion access to information and opportunities for all learners, and it’s never been clearer than in this iteration of our professional standards.

Frugaldad.com image of Media Concentration

Media Concentration: Still Relevant 10 Years Later

Fostering Media Diversity in Libraries: Strategies and Actions was prepared in June 2007 by the now-dissolved American Library Association, Intellectual Freedom Committee Subcommittee on the Impact of Media Concentration on Libraries. These resources are still relevant to libraries today within their key responsiblity to provide access to a diverse collection of resources and services.

Reno vs. ACLU case brief

20 Years of Online Free Speech

On this day 20 years ago, the United States Supreme Court issued a landmark opinion striking down the Communications Decency Act (“CDA”). This statute constituted the first attempt by Congress to regulate the content of material on the Internet. The CDA made it a crime to place content on the Internet that was ‘indecent’ or ‘patently offensive’ if that content would be accessed by minors under the age of 18.