blogger.com

Censorship and the terms of service

Violating Blogspot’s terms of service led to shutting down an artist’s blog with no notice. Many are crying censorship. Is there any sort of recourse when a company owns the platform that’s being used?

Earlier this month, Blogspot suspended artist and writer Dennis Cooper’s blog that he had maintained for the last 14 years with no notice. Cooper has hired a lawyer and made several complaints to Google. The compaints have gone unanswered. The blog remains removed.

Let Kids Be Kids Online

Letting Kids Be Kids, Online

Being part of a public school system, Ms. Vandersande’s school adheres to the Hawaii Department of Education’s computer use policy.
Beyond that, she does not have any additional Internet policy. Part of being in a public school means that the Internet access is already filtered, and Ms. Vandersande has determined that that is enough to ensure that children are cooperating online. She is vocal about allowing students to explore the online world and build their digital literacies. As Ms. Vandersande states, “I didn’t really set any policies “in place”. Kids came in and asked to use the computers, and I said, “sure!” The asked if they were “allowed” to use Google, and I said “sure!” The asked if they could print, and I said, “sure!”

When I asked if she is concerned about monitoring what the students are doing online, she shared a funny anecdote with me.
The worst thing that has happened out of all of this freedom is that a student printed a Google image search of “sad puppies”. It wasted a lot of paper and ink, but it sure was cute!

Libraries at South by Southwest

ALA at SXSW: A Preview of Events in Austin

The marathon South by Southwest (SXSW) conference—nearly two weeks of education, technology, film, and music—starts this week in Austin, Texas, and the American Library Association (ALA) and librarians will be on hand. SXSW provides a vibrant space to look outside libraries at many of the emerging technology trends and innovations likely coming to our campuses and communities, as well as raise the visibility of how libraries and librarians are transforming to create opportunity and meet new demands. It also is a great place to connect and consider new collaborations.