Laptop opening in the dark

Net Neutrality Update: The FCCs Restoring Internet Freedom Order and the Senate’s Joint Resolution

On January 4, 2017, the FCC issued an updated Declaratory Ruling of the Restoring Internet Freedom order, finalizing the changes the FCC would like to see done to it’s former Open Internet policy. While we wait to see how internet access might change under, one hurdle to the enactment of these policies might be the U.S. Congress.

Carpenter v. United States: A Battle for Privacy Rights

As part of a 2011 robbery investigation, law enforcement obtained location data from Timothy Carpenter without a warrant. After his subsequent arrest, Carpenter appealed the decision as a breach of his Fourth Amendment rights, and the case has been heard by the Supreme Court. As technologies like cell phones collect increasing loads of data about us, and as that data paints a more detailed picture of our everyday lives, have privacy laws become outdated?

HTTPS

The State Of HTTPS in Libraries

By: guest blogger T.J. Lamanna. The library field is rife with the mindset of ‘we’ve always done it this way,’ which is why we typically lag behind and become late adopters, rather than pioneers we like to pride ourselves as being. Beyond the security measures HTTPS offers libraries and their patrons, there are other practical reasons for implementing the certificate and adopting tools needed to use library resources safely and efficiently.

Google logo with magnifying glass

Confessions of a Privacy Novice: I Gave my Students’ Privacy to Google

The way I jumped head first into Google Apps for Education as a teacher and school librarian exemplifies my problematic ask-privacy-questions-later approach to student data security. When I read “How Google Took Over the Classroom” in the New York Times last week, I saw myself and my role in Google’s ascension to the K-12 tech throne in a new, more problematic light.

Elsevier

SCI-HUB AS CRIMINAL: A PUBLISHER’S VIEW

My previous posting explored the phenomenon of Sci-Hub, a site dedicated to providing free access to more than 50 million academic papers without regard to their ownership status or to copyright laws. This post looks at the legal issues involved, in contrast to the previous post’s articulation of the argument for open access.