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Choose Privacy Week 2016 – Educational records: More than just grades and detentions in an era of data-driven education

by Kyle Jones (Crossposted from chooseprivacyweek.org) Records define us–partially.  They enclose data and information that reveal our past, present, and increasingly our future.  But they are never perfect representations of […]

Let Kids Be Kids Online

Letting Kids Be Kids, Online

Being part of a public school system, Ms. Vandersande’s school adheres to the Hawaii Department of Education’s computer use policy.
Beyond that, she does not have any additional Internet policy. Part of being in a public school means that the Internet access is already filtered, and Ms. Vandersande has determined that that is enough to ensure that children are cooperating online. She is vocal about allowing students to explore the online world and build their digital literacies. As Ms. Vandersande states, “I didn’t really set any policies “in place”. Kids came in and asked to use the computers, and I said, “sure!” The asked if they were “allowed” to use Google, and I said “sure!” The asked if they could print, and I said, “sure!”

When I asked if she is concerned about monitoring what the students are doing online, she shared a funny anecdote with me.
The worst thing that has happened out of all of this freedom is that a student printed a Google image search of “sad puppies”. It wasted a lot of paper and ink, but it sure was cute!

Creative Commons

Correctly Using Online Images in Digital Projects

Google…it’s a well-loved and well-used search site. While people around the world use Google to locate images, they may not know about the copyright issues accompanying those images. Here is information you may want to know before you use another image from a Google search: Just because it’s on Google, doesn’t mean it can be used for everything

World Religions

Fear and Intellectual Freedom

Discussions of Islam are essential to many subjects; history, literature, art, political science, geography, and science would all be immensely hurt by eliding Islam. Teaching calligraphy without talking about Islam would be like teaching art history without talking about Catholicism. Teachers and scholars need to be able to teach reality, not have to bend curriculum to societal fears. Students and children need to know what is real, not what some wish was real.