Director of Moscow's Library of Ukrainian Literature says not guilty of extremism More: http://tass.com/society/833045

Russian Librarian Jailed Under Suspicion of Providing Banned Materials

Natalia Sharina is the director of the Library of Ukrainian Literature in Moscow. She is currently accused of disseminating extremist literature that has been banned. The official charge is “inciting ethnic hatred and humiliating human dignity.” Sharina has been taken into custody, and the offending materials were confiscated by the Russian authorities.

RFID

Watch: Insecure RFID an excellent avenue for destroying privacy

A video released by Motherboard this week shows how RFID devices sitting around an office (or say, a library) could be used to listen in on conversations from a distance because of the lack of security these devices have. While this video exploits a pretty high-level hack, it does show how a phone can be turned into a bug through a message sent from a wireless printer on the same network.

blogger.com

Censorship and the terms of service

Violating Blogspot’s terms of service led to shutting down an artist’s blog with no notice. Many are crying censorship. Is there any sort of recourse when a company owns the platform that’s being used?

Earlier this month, Blogspot suspended artist and writer Dennis Cooper’s blog that he had maintained for the last 14 years with no notice. Cooper has hired a lawyer and made several complaints to Google. The compaints have gone unanswered. The blog remains removed.

Apple-FBI Privacy Battle

Is Privacy Partisan? Apple verses the FBI

A new article out from The Atlantic examines whether privacy is becoming a partisan issue. Traditionally, digital privacy has been an issue that people from across the political spectrum have been able to come together to support. Between lefty people concerned about civil liberties and people on the right concerned about government encroachment, privacy is one of the issues that has been consistently able to attract strange bedfellows in Washington and throughout the country. However, the recent case between the FBI and Apple has shown that when the question gets reframed, support for digital privacy can drop like a stone.