July 15, 2014

IFAction News Roundup, July 6 – July 12, 2014

The Office for Intellectual Freedom sponsors IFAction, an email list for those who would like updated information on news affecting intellectual freedom, censorship, privacy, access to information, and more. Click here to subscribe to this list. For an archive of all list postings since 1996, visit the IF Action archive. Below is a sample of articles from July 6 – July 12, 2014.

 

Filtering, Censorship, Whistle blowing, Free Press, and Free Speech Articles  

Board removes book [The Miseducation of Cameron Post] from summer reading list [Lewes, DE]

Woman Loses Her Job of 24 Years For Giving Very Common Pleasantry to Customers [KY]

Franken: Net neutrality is ‘First Amendment issue of our time’ 

Google tells music website to censor album covers

Is there a second NSA leaker after Snowden? 

 

Access, the Digital Divide, Net Neutrality, and Intellectual Property Protection Articles 

Google’s Growing Silence on Saving Open Internet Leaves Fight to Startups

Dear Secretary Duncan: Net Neutrality is an Education Issue

‘A Threat to Internet Freedom’

Net Neutrality Survey Finds Fast Lane Support

What Do Kansas and Nebraska Have Against Small Libraries?

 

Privacy, Surveillance, Hacking, and Cybersecurity Articles    

Crypto weakness in smart LED lightbulbs exposes Wi-Fi passwords

LAPD Exposes Login To Data Harvesting Software During Interview With CNN

Why Facebook is beating the FBI at facial recognition

Latest Snowden leak: NSA, FBI targeted prominent US Muslims 

Richard Clarke on the Future of Privacy: Only the Rich Will Have It

July 15, 2014

Zoia Horn, library icon, dies at 96

Zoia Horn, who was chair of the ALA Intellectual Freedom Committee in the mid-70s and who spent 20 days in jail rather than testify in a trial involving anti-Vietnam War activists, died Saturday at the age of 96. Horn’s autobiography, Zoia!, is available online via Archive.org, and includes a copious accounting of her activism.  The California Library Association’s annual intellectual freedom award is named in her honor.

“She lived what she believed,” said Barbara Jones, director of the Office for Intellectual Freedom.  “She didn’t just talk about intellectual freedom and the freedom to read. She was on the front lines her whole career. She was an idol to many, many librarians.”

Library Juice has a short obituary.  And here is a great 2002 profile of her in the San Francisco Chronicle, written in the wake of the passage Patriot Act.  It’s notable that even in her last days, she asked her daughter, Catherine Marrion, to contact OIF in order to bring attention to her opposition to the 1977 ALA film The Speaker.

Marrion has indicated that there will be a memorial service in Oakland next month. We will pass along details when they become available.

July 9, 2014

OIF Director Barbara Jones Asks Cape Henlopen School Board to restore book to summer reading list

Today Barbara Jones,  director of the ALA Office for Intellectual Freedom, sent a letter to the Cape Henlopen Board of Education in Delaware protesting their decision to remove emily m. danforth’s critically acclaimed young adult novel The Miseducation of Cameron Post from its ninth grade summer reading list. The novel, about a young lesbian’s coming of age in 1990′s Montana, was on a list developed by librarians across the state as recommended for incoming high school honors and college prep students.  The letter notes that the school board apparently did not follow its own reconsideration policy in removing the book from its list.

More details about the board’s decision to remove The Miseducation of Cameron Post are available from the local newspaper, the Cape Gazette: Board removes book from summer reading list, and from the Diversity in YA blog.

See also author danforth’s response to the Board’s decision.

Update: The Delaware Library Association also has written a letter to the Cape Henlopen Board of Education, asking them to reconsider the decision to remove The Miseducation of Cameron Post from the summer reading list.

July 8, 2014

IFAction News Roundup, June 29 – July 5, 2014

The Office for Intellectual Freedom sponsors IFAction, an email list for those who would like updated information on news affecting intellectual freedom, censorship, privacy, access to information, and more. Click here to subscribe to this list. For an archive of all list postings since 1996, visit the IF Action archive. Below is a sample of articles from June 29 – July 5, 2014.

 

Filtering, Censorship, Whistle blowing, Free Press, and Free Speech Articles  

Ads prompt libraries to put newspaper out of sight [Detroit]

On the Next Docket: How the First Amendment Applies to Social Media

Feds Ignore First Amendment, Supreme Court Precedent In Seizing Domain Of Social Network For Sex Workers

YouTube reportedly in talks with indie labels to avoid blocking videos

 

Access, the Digital Divide, Net Neutrality, and Intellectual Property Protection Articles 

ALA encourages next step in E-rate improvements

No-IP regains control of some domains wrested by Microsoft

Edtech Startups Protest FCC Proposal for ‘Two-Tiered Internet’

 

Privacy, Surveillance, Hacking, and Cybersecurity Articles    

Butler warns students, staff, alums of data breach [Indianapolis]

Facebook responds to criticism of its experiment on users

New Snowden docs: NSA spies on pretty much everyone abroad

Why a government watchdog says your phone calls are private, but your e-mails are not

Why cyber-insurance will be the next big thing

June 30, 2014

IFAction News Roundup, June 22 – 28, 2014

The Office for Intellectual Freedom sponsors IFAction, an email list for those who would like updated information on news affecting intellectual freedom, censorship, privacy, access to information, and more. Click here to subscribe to this list. For an archive of all list postings since 1996, visit the IF Action archive. Below is a sample of articles from June 22 – June 28, 2014.

 

Filtering, Censorship, Whistle blowing, Free Press, and Free Speech Articles  

Supreme Court Strikes Down Abortion Clinic ‘Buffer Zone’ Law

Carnegie medal under fire after ‘vile and dangerous’ Bunker Diary wins

Celebrate the Freedom to Read With CBLDF’s New Banned Books Week Handbook!

North Korea threatens war on US over Kim Jong-un movie

Filtered-down access: an uncensored look at technology and the LGBT community

 

Access, the Digital Divide, Net Neutrality, and Intellectual Property Protection Articles 

Closing the Connectivity Gap

Gay Dem: Internet can be ‘salvation’

Mayors Strongly Back Network Neutrality

New York and Chicago Libraries Loan Hot Spots like Books

Aereo Defeat Sets Up Bigger, Broader Fight for TV

 

Privacy, Surveillance, Hacking, and Cybersecurity Articles    

Supreme Court Says Phones Can’t Be Searched Without a Warrant

Why the Supreme Court May Finally Protect Your Privacy in the Cloud

U.S. NSA granted extension to collect bulk phone data

Facial recognition proposal lacks privacy protections, advocate says

When a Health Plan Knows How You Shop

June 29, 2014

Monday intellectual freedom meetings & programs @ #ALAAC14

Here’s your daily list of must-do events at the 2014 ALA Annual Conference in Las Vegas!

Monday, June 30

Now Showing @ ALA: The Speaker…A Film About Freedom

When: 8:00-10:00 a.m.
Where: LVCC-N242
Who: Cinephiles, cinephobes, idealists & contrarians
Why me?: In advance of IFC’s Monday program, “Speaking about ‘The Speaker’,” we invite you to join us at a screening of the 42-minute 1977 film produced by the Intellectual Freedom Committee. The film proved highly controversial within the Association. This will be a chance for you to see it for yourself and participate in a moderated discussion. It is also available on YouTube. A pathfinder of resources on the film and attendant controversy is available atwww.ala.org/tools/speaker.

Intellectual Freedom Round Table II

When: 8:30-10:00 a.m.
Where: LVCC-N201
Who: IFRT members and the member-curious
Why me?: IFRT is the ALA member’s best avenue for getting involved in the intellectual freedom activities of the American Library Association. Find out about the committees, programs, and other projects of the Round Table and lend your two cents to the discussion of IF issues faced by librarians, our communities, and the Association.

Information Manipulation Part II: Surveillance

When: 8:30-10:00 a.m.
Where: LVCC-N243
Who: All are welcome.  (Note: we won’t take notes on who is there.) Sponsored by the Committee on Legislation
Why me?:  What does the collection and retention of bulk phone records and other personal information mean for the public and for our library users? Is personal information and Internet access being managed and manipulated by the government and/private companies? Featuring Thomas Susman, Esq., American Bar Association, Director of Government Affairs. A panel of respondents include George Christian, Executive Director of Library Connection and one of the Connecticut Four involved in the FBI/NASA challenge, Vivian R. Wynn, President of Wynn Library Consulting and Chair of the ALA Committee on Legislation and others to discuss the challenges and implications.

Speaking About “The Speaker”

When: 1:00-2:30 p.m.
Where: LVCC-N253
Who: Everyone who is interested in learning more about and discussing the 1977 ALA IFC-produced film, the process by which it was made, the controversy that swirled around it, and what it means for us today and in the future.
Why me?: This is definitely the must-attend program of the 2014 ALA Annual Conference. We strongly suggest you peruse the pathfinder of resources created for this program and the film.

IFC V

When: 3:00-4:00 p.m.
Where: LVCC-N120
Who: Members of the Intellectual Freedom Committee, liaisons, and any member interested in participating in the final meeting of this committee of Council.
Why me?: This final meeting will feature discussions about Council resolutions and revisions to the interpretations of the Library Bill of Rights. A great way to spend a late Monday afternoon in Las Vegas!

June 28, 2014

Sunday intellectual freedom meetings & programs @ #ALAAC14

Here’s your daily list of must-do events at the 2014 ALA Annual Conference in Las Vegas!

Sunday, June 29

Read A Banned Book at the Banned Books Virtual Read-Out (Day 2)

When: 9:00 a.m.-5:00 p.m.
Where: right outside the Exhibit Hall
Who: You!
Why me?: On Saturday and Sunday, SAGE and OIF invite you to the Banned Books Readout Booth, where you can read a short passage from your favorite banned book and then speak from the heart about why that book matters to you. Readings will be video recorded and will be featured on the Banned Books Week YouTube channel during Banned Books Week, September 21-27, 2014. We strongly encourage you to bring your own copy of the book, but some books will be available for your reading.

Intellectual Freedom Committee/Committee on Legislation Joint Meeting

When: 10:30-11:30 a.m.
Where: LVCC-N101
Who: Committee members & anyone interested in the intersection of legislation and intellectual freedom issues.
Why me?: Be the best-informed person on your block!

Now Showing @ ALA: The Speaker…A Film About Freedom

When: 10:30 a.m.-Noon
Where: NVCC-N242
Who: Cinephiles, cinephobes, idealists & contrarians
Why me?: In advance of IFC’s Monday program, “Speaking about ‘The Speaker’,” we invite you to join us at a screening of the 42-minute 1977 film produced by the Intellectual Freedom Committee. The film proved highly controversial within the Association. This will be a chance for you to see it for yourself and participate in a moderated discussion. It will be showing again Sunday, 8:00-10:00 a.m. and is available on YouTube. A pathfinder of resources on the film and attendant controversy is available at www.ala.org/tools/speaker.

What Would You Do? Ethics in Action: Libraries and Law Enforcement

When: 1:00-2:30 p.m.
Where: LVCC-S225
Who: Sponsored by the Committee on Professional Ethics
Why me?: Whether you work at a public, academic, or school library, blurred lines are all around. For example, if a police officer comes to your library asking to view patron records to help locate a missing teenager, where do your professional responsibilities as a librarian end and your civic duties as a member of the community begin? In short, what would you do? Join us to hear from librarians and police officers, review model polices, and role-play scenarios to prepare you for real life ethical dilemmas involving law enforcement.

Surveillance

When: 1:00-2:30 p.m.
Where: LVCC-S232
Who: Sponsored by the ACRL Professional Values Committee. Speakers are Jim Teliha & Seeta Gangadharan (Senior Research Fellow, Open Technology Institute)
Why me?:  Surveillance is a big topic. What implications do the latest disclosures about wide-spread government surveillance have for libraries and librarians? The purpose of this session is to provide librarians an update and refresher on the impact of surveillance. The conversations will include recent NSA disclosures, digital surveillance, as well as laws familiar to all librarians, such as the Patriot Act, FISA, and more.

ALA President’s Program & ALA Awards

When: 4:00-5:30 p.m.
Where: LVCC-N249
Who: Pretty much everyone should attend
Why me?: Keynote speaker Lois Lowry is the keynote speaker for ALA President Barbara Stripling’s program. Joining her will be Jeff Bridges, star of the forthcoming film The Giver, based on Lowry’s frequently challenged novel.  Also featured will be Daniel Handler (aka Lemony Snicket), who will be presenting the first-ever Lemony Snicket Prize for Noble Librarians Faces with Adversity to Laurence Copel, a youth outreach librarian in New Orleans.

June 27, 2014

Saturday intellectual freedom meetings & programs @ #ALAAC14

Here’s your daily list of must-do events at the 2014 ALA Annual Conference in Las Vegas!

Saturday, June 28

Read A Banned Book at the Banned Books Virtual Read-Out

When: 9:00 a.m.-5:00 p.m.
Where: right outside the Exhibit Hall
Who: You!
Why me?: On Saturday and Sunday, SAGE and OIF invite you to the Banned Books Readout Booth, where you can read a short passage from your favorite banned book and then speak from the heart about why that book matters to you. Readings will be video recorded and will be featured on the Banned Books Week YouTube channel during Banned Books Week, September 21-27, 2014. We strongly encourage you to bring your own copy of the book, but some books will be available for your reading.

Intellectual Freedom Committee meetings III & IV

When: 8:30-10:00 a.m. & 10:30-11:30 a.m.
Where: LVCC – N117
Who: Members of the IFC, liaisons & interested guests
Why me?: Participate in ongoing discussions about the revisions to interpretations of the Library Bill of Rights and talk about the IF challenges of the day

Intellectual Freedom Round Table Awards Reception

When: 11:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m.
Where: LVH – Conference Room 08
Who: June Pinnell-Stephens will receive the Oboler Award for her book, Protecting Intellectual Freedom in Your Public Library: Scenarios from the Front Lines.  The New Jersey Library Association Intellectual Freedom Committee will receive the Gerald Hodges Award for their decades of work promoting and defending intellectual freedom.
Why me?: Mix & mingle & support these deserving award winners!

Intellectual Freedom Round Table Program: Intellectual Freedom and the Defense of Graphic Novels and Comic Books

When: 1:00-2:30 p.m.
Where: LVCC – N240
Who: Charles Brownstein, executive director of the Comic Book Legal Defense Fund, will discuss the organization’s activities in defense of comic book creators, sellers, lenders, educators and readers. CBLDF is debuting their Banned Books Week Handout at this conference; check out the PDF here.
Why me?: The theme of Banned Books Week this year is banned and challenged comics and graphic novels. A great opportunity to learn how comics are being challenged and defended in library collections and elsewhere. Maybe you’ll get a great idea for a Banned Books Week program!

IFC/FTRF Issues Briefing Session

When: 3:00-4:00 p.m.
Where: LVCC – N109
Who: Leaders of the Intellectual Freedom Committee and the Freedom to Read Foundation will discuss key issues and litigation affecting access to information, the First Amendment, and libraries.
Why me?: Come to discuss your thoughts on the proposed revisions to the Library Bill of Rights interpretations and learn about some of the Hot Topics in IF.

June 26, 2014

IFAction News Roundup, June 15 – 21, 2014

The Office for Intellectual Freedom sponsors IFAction, an email list for those who would like updated information on news affecting intellectual freedom, censorship, privacy, access to information, and more. Click here to subscribe to this list. For an archive of all list postings since 1996, visit the IF Action archive. Below is a sample of articles from June 15 – June 21, 2014.

 

Filtering, Censorship, Whistle blowing, Free Press, and Free Speech Articles  

Are threats of violence on Facebook criminal, or free speech?

Chilling Speech Is No Laughing Matter

Senators fear plan will muzzle whistleblowers

[Gray County] Texas Deputy Displays Ignorance Of Laws He’s ‘Enforcing’ While Trying To Shut Down A Citizen’s Recording

Glenn Greenwald On Why Privacy Is Vital, Even If You ‘Have Nothing To Hide’

 

Access, the Digital Divide, Net Neutrality, and Intellectual Property Protection Articles 

Dems release bill to block Web ‘fast lanes’ 

Justices limit patents on software technology

How much did your university pay for your journals?

Time to retire the “digital divide?”

FCC chief unveils plan to close ‘Wi-Fi gap’ 

 

Privacy, Surveillance, Hacking, and Cybersecurity Articles    

How to Anonymize Everything You Do Online

Cloud companies have to act on privacy, even if the government won’t

How the European Google Decision May Have Nothing To Do With a Right to Be Forgotten

The ACLU’s latest lawsuit on warrantless cellphone tracking has hit a dead end

The US government doesn’t want you to know how the cops are tracking you

June 19, 2014

Happy 75th anniversary of the Library Bill of Rights!

Today we are pleased to commemorate the 75th anniversary of ALA’s adoption of the Library Bill of Rights on June 19, 1939 at the ALA Annual Conference in San Francisco. The document – which is the basis for the work of the ALA Office for Intellectual Freedom – was created in the wake of several incidents of banning The Grapes of Wrath by John Steinbeck in the late 1930s. It also was inspired by the rising tide of totalitarianism around the world.

The first iteration of  the Library Bill of Rights was a statement by the head of the Des Moines, Iowa, Public Library, Forrest Spaulding. It was adopted as policy by that library on November 21, 1938. Much of the wording remained the same for ALA’s version, although it was more universal.

Since its initial adoption, the Library Bill of Rights has been amended four times.  There are also over 20 official interpretations on issues ranging from Meeting Rooms to Labeling and Ratings Systems.  Many of these interpretations have Q&As associated with them to assist library boards and administrators adapt the policies to their specific circumstances.

To honor the Library Bill of Rights, take some time to read it and consider its meaning and relevance lo these many decades later.  And if you’re on social media, share this post!

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